Murder strikes gay Cameroon teen who sought safety in city

A gay teenager escaped from the dangers of war-torn northwestern Cameroon by moving to the capital to continue his education. But he found no safety there: He was murdered there last Friday.

Lesley Flavour Chia
Lesley Flavour Chia, gay teen who was murdered Oct. 26

According to his friends’ reports:

Lesley Flavour Chia, 19, was robbed and stabbed to death close to his brother’s home, where he sought refuge from the dangers of northwest Cameroon.

The murder occurred about 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26, in a narrow entrance to the house.

Flavour was a gentle young man who was very much still in the closet, so his friends doubt that he was killed because of his sexual orientation.

The teenager had moved from his hometown, Belo in the English-speaking northwest region, and attended school in nearby Bamenda, but his education was interrupted there by clashes between government forces and the area’s Anglophone rebels.

School has not been held in that part of the country for the past two years.

Flavour applied for admission to schools in Yaoundé, but most of the schools where full. His only opportunity was to attend an evening classes at Oxford Comprehensive High School in Yaoundé.

He was in his final year there. He usually attended extra classes on Fridays and Saturdays, which ran from 4 p.m to 8 p.m. On his way home after class he was robbed and stabbed to death.

His hometown, meanwhile, is in ruins. This is how The Guardian described it in an article last May:

An hour and a half’s drive from Bamenda, in Cameroon’s north-west, is Belo, a village largely abandoned except for a military checkpoint manned by drunken soldiers.

In the middle of the road is a burnt motorcycle. A little further on, a corpse is sprawled – someone has tried to cover it with a few handfuls of grass.

Two girls pass by with bags on their heads filled with dried fish. “We barely have any food. That’s why we came back to collect the fish,” they say.

They explain that the corpse belongs to a villager. “There are many more bodies,” they add. “The soldiers burned part of the village.”

Belo is on the frontline of Cameroon’s simmering conflict between anglophone and francophone, an increasingly secessionist struggle that has pitted the French-speaking government in Yaoundé against the recently emerged Anglophone Ambazonia Defence Forces (ADF) and other rebel groups. According to the UN, the fighting has forced an estimated 20,000 Cameroonians to flee to Nigeria.

Many more people forced from their homes remain in the country. On the main road outside Belo, groups of people are moving, laden with possessions, whole families leaving with everything they can carry.

Source: Rights Africa

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Source: 76crimes

Tanzania hunts homosexuals, threatens ’round-up’

A Tanzanian official is threatening to launch a round-up of homosexuals starting next week. Paul Makonda, the governor of Dar-es-Salaam, said his anti-gay “ad hoc team” will “get their hands on them next Monday.”

To prepare for the round-up, he asked the general public yesterday to call him with the names of homosexuals living in Tanzania.

Paul Makonda (Photo courtesy of HIVisasa.co.tz)

The anti-gay governor of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Paul Makonda, says he’s planning to arrest homosexuals so he won’t “anger God.” (Photo courtesy of HIVisasa.co.tz)

Tanzanian officials have made similar threats in the past. “I will publish a list of gay people selling their bodies online [and arrest them],” the deputy health minister said in February 2017.

The Sunday Times of South Africa reported on the latest anti-gay campaign:

Under British colonial-era laws homosexuality is illegal in Tanzania, with same-sex acts between men punishable by a maximum life sentence.

“These homosexuals boast on social networks,” said Makonda, a fervent Christian and loyal ally of president John Magufuli.

“Give me their names,” he demanded. “My ad hoc team will begin to get their hands on them next Monday.”

[Editor’s note: Many LGBT Tanzanians remain in the country, mostly keeping a low profile because of the ongoing crackdown, but Makonda pretends that only outsiders would criticize him for violating LGBT people’s human rights.]

Makonda said he expected criticism from outsiders for his hardline stance but added: “I prefer to anger those countries [instead of] angering God.”

Makonda said homosexual behaviour “tramples on the moral values of Tanzanians and our two Christian and Muslim religions”.

Anti-homosexual sentiment is rife in Tanzania, forcing most gays, lesbians and other sexual minorities to live in secrecy.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli (Photo courtesy of CGTN Africa)

Tanzanian President John Magufuli (Photo courtesy of CGTN Africa)

Political rhetoric against homosexuality has increased since Magufuli’s 2015 election.

Last year the president said that everybody should condemn homosexuality, “even cows” and soon after his government threatened to arrest or deport gay rights activists.

Three South Africans were subsequently expelled for allegedly advocating for same-sex marriage.

[Editor’s note: That sentence refers somewhat inaccurately to a police raid in 2017 that disrupted a meeting of lawyers and activists planning to sue the government to reopen HIV clinics that the government closed. The three lawyers from South Africa were deported.]

Aids clinics have also been shut down under Magafuli, accused of “promoting” homosexuality, while he has encouraged women to abandon birth control and have more babies.

Tanzania’s anti-gay crackdown has been going on for two years despite increasing criticism from human rights activists in Africa and worldwide. (See the article “65 groups protest Tanzania repression, LGBT arrests” from May 2018.)

In addition to the anti-gay repression, human rights groups criticized the Tanzanian government for:

  • Unwarranted closure of media outlets;
  • Persecution of journalists;
  • Targeted assassinations of opposition party members;
  • Restrictions on peaceful protests; and
  • Laws undermining freedom of speech online.

Related articles about the  anti-gay crackdown:

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Source: 76crimes

Muslim trans rights activist murdered in Nigeria

A Muslim human rights activist at a Nigerian trans advocacy organization has been found murdered and buried in a shallow grave in his dirt-floored home in Abuja, Nigeria.

Bamanga Rabiu popularly known as Rabina

Trans rights activist Bamanga Rabiu, popularly known as Rabina

Human rights activists working on the case reported that the  decomposing body of Bamanga Rabiu, popularly known as Rabina, was found in a shallow grave in his small room, with some parts of his body covered by a mattress.

Bamanga Rabiu’s decomposing body found buried in his small room.

Bamanga Rabiu’s decomposing body found buried in his small room.

The time of his death has not yet been determined. The body reportedly was found by someone who is now in custody during the police investigation.

Other activists say that it is unclear why anyone would want to murder Rabiu, because he was a lovable person with a charming personality. Given the manner at which he was killed and buried, they are now leaning toward believing that his death was a hate crime.

Speaking to NoStringsNG, an activist working on the case said:

“There are so many questions surrounding his death, especially how he was killed and hurriedly buried in a shallow grave in his room.”

Rabiu reportedly had worked as a peer educator for the International Centre for Advocacy on Rights to Health (ICARH). Later he later joined Trans and Intersex People (TIP) for Human Rights in Nigeria (THRIN).

Both organizations are based in Abuja.

Related article:

 

 

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Source: 76crimes

Updates: Liberia, Jamaica, Chechnya, Russia/Norway

A campaign to reduce anti-gay and anti-HIV+ stigma in West Africa, an Inter-American case against Jamaica’s sodomy law, a Russian/Norwegian Pride celebration — see coverage of those topics and more below.

From the UNAIDS Equal Eyes recap of the world’s LGBT news:

Barents Pride (Photo courtesy of RFE/RL)

Barents Pride (Photo courtesy of RFE/RL)

RUSSIA / NORWAY: A risky shared Pride

In Norway, around 300 people gathered for the second ever Barents Pride held in a small town near the Russian-Norwegian border. Unlike most Pride events around the world, many participants of Barents Pride wear “No Photo” stickers because they have travelled from Russia and fear being “lit up”, meaning they are identified at home. Journalist Richard Bakker talked to participants, including those who’ve been granted asylum in Norway, about why they come despite their fears.

LIBERIA: Campaign against stigma

The Liberia Anti-AIDS Media Network has launched a campaign to reduce social stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV, sexual minorities, and transgender people. Liberia criminalizes consensual sexual relations between same-sex people with up to a year imprisonment.

The new campaign hopes to improve public health interventions and will train 20 journalists and civil society members to promote sexual reproductive health rights.

JAMAICA: Seeking an end to anti-gay law

The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) announced it will review Jamaica’s laws that criminalize same-sex sexual activityw with up to life imprisonment.  The plaintiffs, Gareth Henry and Simone Edwards, a gay man and lesbian woman, submitted the case six years ago after fleeing the country. Henry has since been granted asylum in Canada and Edwards found asylum in the Netherlands. Read more via Caribbean 360

 

Maksim Lapunov (Aleksandr Nemenow photo courtesy of AFP)

Maksim Lapunov (Aleksandr Nemenow photo courtesy of AFP)

CHECHNYA: How investigators ignore anti-gay purge

“Everyone accused me of being gay and said that people like me should be killed. They put a plastic bag on my head when they took me out of the cell. They wrapped my head with Scotch tape, leaving only a slot to breathe through. They beat my legs and arms.” That is Maksim Lapunov’s description of his captivity in Chechnya during that Russian republic’s 2017 purge.

Journalist Carl Schreck investigated the lack of progress made in holding Chechnya accountable for the purge perpetrated on suspected gay men last year. The LGBT-Network says 130 sexual minorities have been evacuated from Chechnya. And Maksim Lapunov, the only victim to come forward on the record, filed a detailed formal complaint. However, investigators have declined to open a criminal case.

 

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Source: 76crimes

Anti-gay law in Kenya might die in February

The Kenyan High Court in Nairobi has set Feb. 22, 2019, as the date when it will announce whether it will overturn the law condemning people convicted of consensual gay sex to as much as 14 years in prison.

Logo of the National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission of Kenya

Logo of the National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission of Kenya

Kenya’s National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (NGLHRC), an independent human rights organization, is challenging the constitutionality of the law.

The organization was founded by a group of Kenyan lawyers to protect the basic rights of LGBT people to live with dignity, free from discrimination and abuse.

Kenya’s anti-gay law is currently unenforced, but it encourages discriminatory and sometimes violently anti-LGBT attitudes among many Kenyans.

The Kenyan anti-gay law is one of more than 70 such laws in nations worldwide, though the majority of the world’s nations have repealed their laws that once made same-sex intimacy a crime. The latest countries to do so have been India and Trinidad.

Njeri Gateru, executive director of NGLHRC, stated:

“These colonial legacy laws undermine LGBT people’s fundamental rights as enshrined in our Constitution and ostracise them from society, causing misery and isolation, and devastating their lives.

“We believe that this wrong must be put right. There is no place in our proud Kenyan democracy for old discriminatory laws.”

A press release from the organization explained further:

Kenyan High Court Sets Ruling Date for Case Seeking to Decriminalize Same-Sex Relations

The Kenya High Court in Nairobi has set aside the 22/02/2019 as the day it will deliver a ruling in a case challenging sections of the Kenyan Penal Code that make consensual same sex acts between adults punishable with up to 14 years imprisonment. In a similar case, the Indian Supreme Court recently ruled that sections of the Penal Code banning same sex acts were unconstitutional.

The case before the High Court in Nairobi was brought forward by the National Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, an independent human rights body that provides free legal aid services to LGBT persons. Since its inception in 2013, its legal aid center has received over 3,000 cases of violations against LGBT persons. These include murder, sexual assault, mob violence, blackmail and extortion. The NGLHRC has long argued that the disputed sections of the Penal Code are used to justify violence against LGBT persons by criminalizing their identities.

Kenya’s Penal Code is a holdover from its colonial era and like many former British colonies retains anti-buggery laws that make vague reference to “carnal knowledge against the order of nature” and “gross indecency.”

Speaking after the mention, Executive Director of NGLHRC, Ms. Njeri Gateru stated:

Njeri Gateru, head of legal affairs for the NGLHRC Kenyan LGBTI rights advocacy group. (Photo courtesy of YouTube)

Firm opponent of Kenya’s anti-gay law: Njeri Gateru, executive director of the NGLHRC, which is challenging that law in court. (Photo courtesy of YouTube)

“As lawyers, we believe in the equal protection of the rule of law and in the superior legal framework of the Kenyan Constitution. These colonial legacy laws undermine LGBT people’s fundamental rights as enshrined in our Constitution and ostracise them from society, causing misery and isolation, and devastating their lives.

“We believe that this wrong must be put right. There is no place in our proud Kenyan democracy for old discriminatory laws.”

The case was heard by a three judge bench on February 22nd – 23rd 2018 and 1st March, alongside a similar petition brought forward by the Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Kenya (GALCK) and Nyanza Rift Valley and Western Kenya (NYARWEK).

The NGLHRC has an established track record of legal victories on LGBT issues in Kenya. In March 2018, it won a case at the Court of Appeals challenging the use of forced anal examinations to determine the sexual orientation of men suspected of being gay.

The NGLHRC added:

LGBT stands for ‘lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender’. The category generally includes anyone who sits outside conventional stereotypes on gender and heterosexuality. LGBT people are often targeted for being masculine or feminine in a way that doesn’t fit with what is expected of them but are just as likely to be completely indiscernible from everyone else: LGBT people are all of us. They are doctors, politicians, boda-boda riders, street sweepers and everything in between. They are our neighbours. They are our sons and daughters, brothers and sisters, parents and grandparents. They are ordinary Kenyans, who are a part of every subsection of our society.

Related articles:

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Source: 76crimes

Publicity + charity: Cross-dresser helps arrested viral video star

An HIV-positive dancer, one of 57 people arrested in an anti-gay raid in Nigeria in August, has just received a charitable donation toward his medical care from a cross-dressing Nigerian bleaching-cream entrepreneur.

Obialor James Brown (left) and cross-dresser/entrepreneur Okuneye Idris (Bobrisky) pose with Bobrisky’s donation.

After the arrests and the release of the 57 suspects, dancer Obialor James Brown proclaimed his innocence and told his story in an interview on “Bar Room Therapy,” a Nigerian cable TV show. The video of that show went viral.

Cross-dresser/entrepreneur Okuneye Idris, who is popularly known as Bobrisky, shared on Instagram that he was moved to support Brown for courageously speaking out about his HIV-positive status and for defending himself after the arrests. Brown and 56 others were paraded before the media by the police in Lagos. All were later released.

Bobrisky wrote about his donation of 100,000 naira (about U.S. $275) to Brown:

“I’m inspired by u darling cos u came out to tell the world wat u are going through. The day I saw your viral video I was so like ‘who is dis strong ???? guy?’ Now let me tell u darling…. Ask me anything I mean your heart desire I’m ready to support u. Lets start from 100,000 cash first.”

Brown shared videos of the two of them on Instagram dancing and showing off the money that Bobrisky donated.

In recent weeks, Brown has been enjoying massive attention from the media, and the number of his followers on social media has increased rapidly, making him an instant celebrity.

Source: Rights Africa

Related article:

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Source: 76crimes

Shock for Nigerian family of student in UK: He’s gay

A coming-out story that’s like many such stories in Nigeria, except this time it happened online: Two Nigerian parents are in shock after their son told them in a WhatsApp conversation that he is gay. The young man, Dan Yomi, is currently a student  in the United Kingdom.

Dan Yomi after coming out

Yomi, the first black Student Union president at Bournemouth University, first came out to his family on WhatsApp, then revealed that information publicly on Instagram. His announcement was met with mixed reactions from Nigerians after a screenshot of his coming-out message went viral on the internet.

Yomi’s coming-out message .

Recently he revealed in an Instagram video that his parents are having a hard time accepting his sexuality, especially his mother who he said has been crying since he came out.

Despite everything that followed after he came out, Yomi is holding up. He says he feels overwhelmed but also free. He came out to his parents because of his love for them, he says.

He adds, “The worst thing you can do to someone you claim to love is to make them love an untrue version of you.”

Source: Rights Africa

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Source: 76crimes

Montego Bay Pride is now 1,000 people strong

Once again, Montego Bay Pride was a success, and this year’s fourth annual celebration was larger than ever. Here are some excepts from Facebook posts and news articles about the multi-day celebration, which this year included a March for Rights seeking recognition of the human rights of LGBTQI people.

Maurice Tomlinson poses at Montego Bay Pride, which he organized. The caption on this photo on Facebook rightly labels him "The fantastic Maurice Tomlinson."

Maurice Tomlinson poses at Montego Bay Pride, which he organized. The caption on this photo on Facebook rightly labels him “The fantastic Maurice Tomlinson.”

Excerpts:

Groundbreaking work, Maurice Tomlinson. LivingLegend! Trailblazer!

It’s an honour to know you.

For the first time, brave LGBTQI activists took to the streets to march in Montego Bay Pride. In previous years, Montego Bay Pride consisted of private parties and flash mobs in secret locations. [This year] more than 1,000 people took part.

Organizer and AIDSlaw human rights lawyer Maurice Tomlinson said Jamaica’s LGBTQI community “remains undaunted in light of countless threats of violence from right-wing extremists.” We stand in solidarity with them and salute their courage!

Montego Bay Pride's March for RIghts on Oct. 14 (Photo courtesy of Mckoy's News)

Montego Bay Pride’s March for RIghts on Oct. 14 (Photo courtesy of Mckoy’s News)

A video of the March for Rights shows that it was joyful, though risky, for participants.

Jamaica’s Gleaner newspaper covered the Oct. 14 march with an article headlined:

LGBT march with pride in spite of fear

Some members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) group took to the streets of Montego Bay, St James, on Sunday to make it clear that they would like to be accepted in society the way they are.

In a well-organised march, the LGBT community managed to evade the eyes of the wider public as they used a deserted roadway in the parish. In a three-minute video, persons were seen gyrating and having a good time as music blasted in the background.

Organiser of the march and president of Montego Bay Pride Maurice Tomlinson said that the event was a success and incident-free even though there was fear among the revellers.

“At the outset, there was fear. Many persons who were on the march were skeptical, but the police had a large presence. I think there were about 25 of them and the roads were blocked off, so it would be hard for anyone to come on the march and do us any harm,” he said.

Dancing and marching for rights. (Photo courtesy of Facebook)

Dancing and marching for rights. (Photo courtesy of Facebook)

Tomlinson told The Gleaner that the LGBT community is aware of the homophobic society that they live in, and so it was a pleasure to see that so many persons walked bravely to showcase that they are someone as well.

“We hoped to get at least 50 LGBT Jamaicans to bravely walk despite the very real fears that the community feels as a result of the alarming levels of homophobic violence and views that exist in our society. However, more than 100 persons showed up,” he said.

The march, which was called ‘Walk for Rights’, was done at the end of their annual Pride week. Tomlinson said that it was a new development as the LGBT community tries to raise awareness among the nation.

He said that they were no longer willing to accept the denial of their human rights by some members of society and the Government, and through the march, they aimed to open the minds of people and stop homophobia.

Head of the Corporate Communications Unit of the Jamaica Constabulary Force (JCF) Assistant Superintendent of Police Dahlia Garrick said that the permit was sought and given to the organisers for the 30-minute event. She said that the JCF recognised that the human rights of every citizen should be respected, and as such, they were not denied their rights.

“We ensured that their human rights were observed and respected, and they were given the highest level of professionalism,” she said.

Tomlinson said: “Montego Bay Pride deliberately coincides with this holiday (National Heroes Day), which celebrates our heroes who struggled and sometimes died for complete liberation of all Jamaicans. Our heroes’ many sacrifices were also made for LGBT citizens.”

He added that there were more marches in the pipeline, and they were hoping that more groups and organisations, including corporate donors, would assist in the upcoming events.

Tomlinson wrote to the Gleaner:

As a small grass-roots ‘Pride’ we have been able to be very ‘edgy’. So, growing from a small pool party in 2015 with just over 150 persons, we have constantly added programmes, and this year, we had a weeklong celebration that saw over 1,000 persons participating. Some of the highlights from this year’s Pride included an LGBT film festival, which included the world premiere of A Colourful Fight, which was produced entirely in Montego Bay. We also had a thought-provoking panel discussion on the different approaches to LGBT liberation, globally.

Our social justice project saw LGBT community members painting a building that serves the public, and this year, it was the Cornwall Regional Hospital. A Pride Praise & Worship Service presided over by the Rev Canon Garth Minott preceded the groundbreaking walk and a fun-filled beach day. In addition to many local and international guests this year, we also welcomed a representative from the EU delegation in Jamaica.

Montego Bay Pride will continue to ‘push the envelope’ so that one day, LGBT people will not only feel but actually BE legal in our homeland.

Articles about Montego Bay Pride 2017:

Articles about Montego Bay Pride in 2015 and 2016:

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Source: 76crimes

Gay rights? ‘Shut up’ says world parliamentary forum

A coalition of largely anti-gay nations has voted to block discussion of LGBT rights at a global forum of parliamentary governments.

Gay rights opponents from Uganda cheer the defeat of a proposal for the Inter-Parliamentary Union to discuss anti-gay discrimination and rights abuses.
Gay rights opponents from Uganda cheer the defeat of a proposal for the Inter-Parliamentary Union to discuss anti-gay discrimination and rights abuses.

The Inter-Parliamentary Union voted 689 to 499 against a proposal to discuss “The role of Parliaments in ending discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity and ensuring respect for the human rights of LGBT persons.”

Logo of the Inter-Parliamentary Union
Logo of the Inter-Parliamentary Union

Those 689 members of national parliaments apparently were not thinking of the organization’s motto — “For democracy. For everyone.” — when they voted not to even talk about ensuring human rights for all.

Members of Uganda’s parliament were prominent in the opposition to the proposal, particularly Speaker Rebecca Kadaga.

Melanie Nation, executive director of the African Human Rights Coalition, commented:

It is a sad day when so many people who seek refuge from criminalization and persecution from their own countries receive further abuse at the hands of a global body such as the Inter-Parliamentary Union. This is a body which ought to place human rights and protections for these very people at the fore.
It is as if these criminalizing and persecutory nations are trying to contain and control the only protections available to persecuted LGBT people, which obviously involves global protections in the form of exile and migration. This may well lead to a split in the organization, as it becomes a reality for states which protect all people equally to realize that it is not possible to continue to function in a climate so contrary to basic human decency – to turn against the most marginalized of refugees and asylum seekers, who have a right to protections from other nations.

Mamba Online reported:

Outrage as international lawmakers vote to ban LGBT debates

It’s been reported that Uganda has joined a gang of anti-LGBT nations in banning any discussions on LGBT rights at the International Parliamentary Union (IPU). …
Video posted on the Facebook page of the Parliament of Uganda of the session in Geneva showed the jubilant Ugandan delegation clapping and cheering at the outcome. Kadaga said the decision was a victory against “uncivilised and unchristian behaviours” at the IPU.

Gay rights opponent Rebecca Kadaga, speaker of the Ugandan parliament
Gay rights opponent Rebecca Kadaga, speaker of the Ugandan parliament

“I am so happy that this battle has finally been won,” Kadaga was quoted as saying by Daily Monitor. “It started in St. Petersburg in Russia when they attempted to smuggle it in. Today, we have made a final vote that will prohibit the issue of LGBT from appearing on the IPU agenda.”
In March, Kadaga threatened a walk-out when attempts were made to discuss LGBT rights at the 138th IPU Assembly.
Ugandan MP Francis Mwijukye Francis told The Observer: “We shall continue to fight the LGBT issues on the international level until people here appreciate that same-sex is inhuman and anti-culture.”
DA MP Michael Waters, who was part of the South African delegation at the IPU this week, said on Facebook that the vote “was a very sad day for human rights”. He commented that, “Parliaments are supposed to debate controversial issues and listen to other people’s points of view…”

Edwin Sesange, director of the London-based African Equality Foundation, objected to the vote, stating:

“The world cannot allow itself to be silenced by some members of parliaments who are driven by hatred, torture, discrimination and persecution of innocent LGBTI people.”


Source: Rights Africa

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Source: 76crimes

Lesbian mom flees Cameroon; kids need your help

A Cameroonian lesbian is seeking help for her children, who remain in their homeland until they can rejoin her in the United States.  After learning that she was beaten, raped, jailed, fired from her job, and shunned in Cameroon, the U.S. has granted her asylum, but has not yet approved a request for the children to join her.

This photo is an illustration on a GoFundMe appeal to support the children of a Cameroonian lesbian to whom the United States has granted asylum from her anti-LGBT homeland. The children remain in Cameroon until they can rejoin their mother in the U.S.

This photo is an illustration on a GoFundMe appeal to support the children of a Cameroonian lesbian to whom the United States has granted asylum from her anti-LGBT homeland. The children remain in Cameroon until they can rejoin their mother in the U.S.

She hopes to avoid the need to abandon the safety of the U.S. and return to Cameroon to take care of the children.

Supporters in the U.S. have launched this online fund drive for her:

We are raising funds to help an asylee mother (whom we will call Marie for her privacy), and her children, who have been prevented from joining her in the U.S. The funds we collect will be used for the children’s medical care and their school fees.

Marie suffered indescribable horrors in her home country of Cameroon because she is a lesbian. When her sexual orientation was discovered, she was beaten, raped, jailed, fired from her job, and shunned from her community. Marie had to make the gut-wrenching decision to flee her county for fear of being murdered, leaving her two sons in the care of a relative.

Marie was fortunate to gain asylum in the U.S. and currently resides in the Bay Area. However, her children have not been authorized to join her in the U.S. Marie is working very hard — often up to 18 hours per day — to pay for her children’s needs and cover her own living expenses. One of her sons is malnourished and anemic and has been in the hospital for weeks. She can no longer afford the children’s school fees, so they have had to stop going to school.

We believe there is still hope that Marie’s children will be allowed to join her in the U.S. But for now, she and the children desperately need our help. Please give any (even very small) amount you can. Thank you!

The appeal is for $5,000. So far (as this article was written), $1,040 had been raised.

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Source: 76crimes